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Thread: Income Test and Payment rates for Family Tax Benefit Part A, Department of Human Services.

  1. #1
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    Income Test and Payment rates for Family Tax Benefit Part A, Department of Human Services.

    This information will help you work out if you can claim Family Tax Benefit Part A if you are not already looking at this it maybe of help.

    First look at the Income Test for Family Tax Benefit Part A:
    Income test for Family Tax Benefit Part A

    Income test for Family Tax Benefit Part A

    The income test for Family Tax Benefit Part A is a guide only, and is updated on 1 July each year.
    The income test does not apply if you or your partner gets an income-support payment, such as a pension, benefit, or allowance or a Department of Veterans’ Affairs service pension.
    Income test

    If your family’s adjusted taxable income for this financial year is $47,815 or less, your payment will not be affected by the income test.
    In most cases, your Family Tax Benefit Part A payment is worked out using two income tests. We will apply the test that gives you the highest rate of payment.
    The first test reduces the maximum rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A by 20 cents for each dollar above $47,815 until your payment reaches the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A.
    The second test reduces the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A by 30 cents for each dollar above $94,316 (plus $3,796 for each Family Tax Benefit child after the first) until your payment reaches nil.
    If your family income is close to the maximum cut-off, you should check your eligibility after the end of the financial year, once your actual income is known.
    Maintenance-income test

    If you get more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A, a maintenance income test may also apply.
    The maintenance-income test applies if you or your partner receives, or is entitled to receive child support or spousal maintenance, and you are eligible to get more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A. If you or your partner is permanently blind and on specific pension payments, you may be exempt from the maintenance-income test.
    Maintenance-income test free areas (per year)

    If you get more child-support/spousal maintenance than the amounts below, it may reduce your Family Tax Benefit Part A by 50 cents in the dollar, until it reaches the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A.
    Status Child support received (per year)
    Single parent or member of a couple, receiving maintenance $1,445.40
    Couple, both receiving maintenance $2,890.80
    For each additional child, add $481.80
    We may automatically adjust your regular payments to avoid or reduce a projected Family Tax Benefit overpayment. This will apply to you if you get your payment in fortnightly instalments.
    Annual-income limit for payment of base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A

    For financial year: 2012–2013

    Income limits are indicative only, please contact us for a more accurate assessment based on your circumstances.
    Number of children aged 0–12 years Number of children of 13–15 years or secondary students of 16–19 years
    Nil 1 2 3
    Nil $69,496 $91,177 n/a
    1 $62,853 $84,534 n/a n/a
    2 $77,891 $99,572 n/a n/a
    3 $92,929 n/a n/a n/a
    Where n/a is shown,the base rate does not usually apply for this household combination. This is because the rate calculated under the first income test for this combination is usually higher than the rate calculated under the second income test, which applies the base rate.
    Income limits will be higher if you are eligible for Rent Assistance.
    Children aged 16 years or more who have completed Year 12 are eligible for the base rate only.
    Maximum adjusted taxable income limit

    These are the annual income limits at which Family Tax Benefit Part A including the supplement stop.
    For financial year: 2012–2013

    Income limits are indicative only, please contact us for a more accurate assessment based on your circumstances.
    Number of children aged 0–12 years Number of children of 13–15 years or secondary students of 16–19 years
    Nil 1 2 3
    Nil $101,458 $112,603 $146,530
    1 $101,458 $112,396 $139,887 $173,813
    2 $112,396 $133,244 $167,170 $201,097
    3 $126,601 $160,527 $194,454 $228,381
    Income limits will be higher if you are eligible for Rent Assistance.





    Now looking at the Payments for Family Tax Benefit Part A:


    Payment rates for Family Tax Benefit Part A

    Payment rates for Family Tax Benefit Part A

    The amount of Family Tax Benefit Part A you get paid depends on your actual family income, how many children you have, and how old they are.
    Use our Online Estimators to estimate or compare the Family Tax Benefit you may get, based on your current or proposed circumstances.
    Maximum payment rates

    The maximum amounts of Family Tax Benefit Part A you can get for each child are updated on 1 July each year.
    For each child aged Maximum rate of Part A per fortnight
    0–12 years $169.68
    13–15 years $220.64
    16–19 years, secondary student $220.64
    16–17 years, having completed secondary study $54.32
    Up to 19 years of age in an approved care organisation $54.32
    Approved care organisations provide residential care for young people—for example, for young people who are homeless, are refugees, or have a disability.
    Base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A

    These are the base amounts of Family Tax Benefit Part A you can get for each child.
    For each child Per fortnight
    under 18 years $54.32
    18–19 years, secondary student $54.32
    Family Tax Benefit Part A supplement is paid after the end of the financial year once your income details are confirmed by the Australian Taxation Office. The amount is not included in the fortnightly figures.
    Family Tax Benefit Part A supplement

    You can also get Family Tax Benefit Part A supplement of up to $726.35 for each child, when your payments have been balanced after the end of the financial year. This will happen after you and your partner (if you have one) have lodged your tax returns and your income details are confirmed by the Australian Taxation Office or advise you are not required to lodge. The amount of supplement you receive will depend on your family income or circumstances.
    If your child is turning four years old and you receive an income support payment from Centrelink or the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, your supplement may be withheld if your child does not get a health check to ensure they are healthy, fit and ready to learn when they start school.
    The supplement may also be withheld if a child is not fully immunised at age one, two and five. To meet the immunisation requirements, children will need to be 'fully immunised', be on a recognised immunisation catch up schedule, or have an approved exemption.
    Large Family supplement

    You may get $11.76 a fortnight for your third child, and each child you have after that.
    Multiple Birth Allowance

    You may get $140.84 a fortnight for triplets or $187.80 a fortnight for quadruplets or more for whom you get Family Tax Benefit Part A. You do not need to lodge a separate claim for this payment.
    Child Support

    To receive more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A for a child up to 18 years of age from a previous relationship, you or your partner must apply for a Child Support assessment. To apply for child support from the other parent of the child, you or your partner should contact us on 131 272.
    If you have a child in secondary school who is turning 18 this year, you should contact us about extending your child support assessment to the end of the school year.
    You need to apply before your child’s 18th birthday or your Child Support assessment will end when your child turns 18, and your Family Tax Benefit payment will reduce to the base rate of $54.52.

    If there is anything that makes it difficult for you or your partner to apply for child support from the other parent, or you or your partner are unsure of what to do, you should contact us on 131 272 to discuss the situation.
    Shared care

    If you share the care of your child, there are special rules about how much Family Tax Benefit you can be paid.





    If you have any questions feel free to ask and I will try to answer them, I know how confusing the humanservices.gov.au website can be!
    Gav likes this.



  2. #2
    Gav
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    MrMoneyExpert, not sure if you're around any more just wondering if you've got an update about how the 2014-15 budget affected the tax benefits for families?

    From what I can see on the page certain amounts have gone up:
    Income test for Family Tax Benefit Part A

    The income test for Family Tax Benefit Part A is a guide only, and is updated on 1 July each year.
    The income test does not apply if you or your partner gets an income-support payment, such as a pension, benefit, or allowance or a Department of Veterans’ Affairs service pension.
    Income test

    If your family’s adjusted taxable income for this financial year is $48,837 or less, your payment will not be affected by the income test.
    In most cases, your Family Tax Benefit Part A payment is worked out using two income tests. We will apply the test that gives you the highest rate of payment.
    The first test reduces the maximum rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A by 20 cents for each dollar above $48,837 until your payment reaches the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A.
    The second test reduces the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A by 30 cents for each dollar above $94,316 (plus $3,796 for each Family Tax Benefit child after the first) until your payment reaches nil.
    If your family income is close to the maximum cut-off, you should check your eligibility after the end of the financial year, once your actual income is known.
    Maintenance-income test

    If you get more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A, a maintenance income test may also apply.
    The maintenance-income test applies if you or your partner receives, or is entitled to receive child support or spousal maintenance, and you are eligible to get more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A. If you or your partner is permanently blind and on specific pension payments, you may be exempt from the maintenance-income test.
    Maintenance-income test free areas (per year)

    If you get more child support or spousal maintenance than the amounts below, it may reduce your Family Tax Benefit Part A by 50 cents in the dollar, until it reaches the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A.
    Status Child support received (per year)
    Single parent or member of a couple, receiving maintenance $1,478.25
    Couple, both receiving maintenance $2,956.50
    For each additional child, add $492.75
    We may automatically adjust your regular payments to avoid or reduce a projected Family Tax Benefit overpayment. This will apply to you if you get your Family Tax Benefit payment in fortnightly instalments.
    Maintenance Income Credit

    If you get irregular child support payments over more than 1 financial year, when Family Tax Benefit reconciliation occurs, Maintenance Income Credit may be applied to ensure you receive the same amount of Family Tax Benefit Part A over time as a person who receives their child support payments on time.
    The Maintenance Income Credit is for customers whose child support is registered for collection by us with irregular child support payments.
    The Maintenance Income Credit works by allowing you to ‘carry over’ your unused Maintenance-income free area balance from previous financial years. If you receive child support arrears in a later financial year, we can use any available Maintenance Income Credit balance to reduce the impact on your Family Tax Benefit Part A, when your Family Tax Benefit entitlements are balanced.
    Example
    At the end of the 2010-11 financial year, Carrie has a $500 Maintenance Income Credit balance. Carrie receives a $400 arrears payment of child support during the 2011-12 financial year.
    When Carrie’s Family Tax Benefit entitlements for the 2011-12 financial year are balanced, the amount of child support arrears that Carrie received is offset against her available Maintenance Income Credit balance. This means that the $400 child support arrears that Carrie received will be taken into account during the balancing process and will not affect her Family Tax Benefit Part A for the 2011-12 financial year.
    Carrie would then have a remaining Maintenance Income Credit balance of $100.

    You do not need to ask for us to use your available Maintenance Income Credit balance. The Maintenance Income Credit is automatically calculated and applied as part of the balancing process.
    Annual-income limit for payment of base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A

    For financial year: 2013–2014

    Income limits are indicative only, please contact us for a more accurate assessment based on your circumstances.
    Number of children aged 0–12 years Number of children of 13–15 years or secondary students of 16–19 years
    Nil 1 2 3
    Nil $71,230 $93,623 n/a
    1 $64,350 $86,743 n/a n/a
    2 $79,862 n/a n/a n/a
    3 $95,375 n/a n/a n/a
    Where n/a is shown, the base rate does not usually apply for this household combination. This is because the rate calculated under the first income test for this combination is usually higher than the rate calculated under the second income test, which applies the base rate.
    Income limits will be higher if you are eligible for Rent Assistance.
    Children aged 16 years or more who have completed Year 12 are eligible for the base rate only.
    Maximum adjusted taxable income limit

    These are the annual income limits at which Family Tax Benefit Part A including the supplement stop.
    For financial year: 2013–2014

    Income limits are indicative only, please contact us for a more accurate assessment based on your circumstances.
    Number of children aged 0–12 years Number of children of 13–15 years or secondary students of 16–19 years
    Nil 1 2 3
    Nil $101,653 $115,632 $150,599
    1 $101,653 $112,785 $143,719 $178,686
    2 $112,785 $136,839 $171,806 $206,773
    3 $129,959 $164,926 $199,893 $234,860
    Income limits will be higher if you are eligible for Rent Assistance.


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